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The Irish Catholic Newspaper

 

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Thirty years ago, Athlone woman Marion Carroll arrived at Knock Shrine in a stretcher suffering from multiple sclerosis. During the Mass she received benediction with the Blessed Sacrament and her sight and speech was restored and she began to walk.

 

At the weekend she returned to Knock to hear Archbishop Neary pronounce that “today the Church formally acknowledges that this healing does not admit of any medical explanation and joins in prayer, praise and thanksgiving to God."

 

Here in this 2014 video, Marion shared her story with The Irish Catholic.

 

https://fb.watch/7IVvlIqJ9n/

 

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Kerry's Downton Abbey: Pierce Mahony & the Kilmorna House Visitors Book

 

Kerry Writers' Museum

 

Charles Stewart Parnell, WB Yeats, Maud Gonne, as well as songwriter Percy French and Home Rule advocate John Redmond had one thing in common - they all stayed at Kilmorna House just outside Listowel in the later years of the 19th century. Their signatures appear with dozens of others in the Kilmorna visitors book which records their visits to the home of Pierce Mahony, nationalist MP and renowned philanthropist, horticulturalist and Irish chieftain. He was the half-brother of Sir Arthur Vicars, the former Ulster King of Arms and keeper of the Irish Crown Jewels, who was killed by the IRA on April 14th, 1921 at Kilmorna and the Great House burned to the ground.

 

 

 

In this lecture, historian Tom Dillon explores the history uncovered by the Kilmorna House visitors book and discusses how it gives an insight into life on the Kilmorna estate in the late 1800s, when it welcomed some of the most prominent political and cultural figures of the time.

 

 

 

This is the second lecture in the North Kerry War of Independence Centenary Commemoration series hosted by Kerry Writers' Museum and kindly supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Art, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries Programme.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhZ0YoEZg98

 

 

 

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Kerry Writers' Museum

 

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Sir Arthur Edward Vicars was a genealogist and heraldic expert. He was appointed Ulster King of Arms in 1893 but was removed from the post in 1908 following the theft of the Irish Crown Jewels in the previous year.  Although Vicars was never seriously suspected of being involved in their theft, the incident led to his ruin.

 

 

 

On April 14th, 1921 while staying with his sister at Kilmorna House, just outside Listowel, Vicars was taken from the house, led to the end of the garden and shot by members of the IRA North Kerry Flying Column.

 

 

 

Based on his 2003 book ‘The Stealing of the Irish Crown Jewels: An Unsolved Crime’, this lecture by historian, author and broadcaster Myles Dungan recounts details of the audacious robbery and Vicar’s fall from grace as a result.

 

 

 

This is the first in a series of lectures organised by Kerry Writers' Museum as part of it's North Kerry War of Independence Centenary Commemoration Programme.  The lecture is kindly supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Art, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media for its generous support under the Decade of Centenaries Programme.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oge7fivfHro

 

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Patrolman Philip Fitzpatrick was born in Aughavas, Co. Leitrim in 1892, and emigrated to America in the early 1920s, settling like so many Irish men and Irish women in New York City. He joined New York's Finest in 1926 and became a Patrolman, assigned to Mounted Squad 1 in Manhattan.

 

 

 

Patrolman Fitzpatrick wrote the song, "Lovely Leitrim," in a loving tribute to his beloved home county. Popularized when it was recorded by Larry Cunningham, the song is still loved both in Ireland and the US.

 

https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/who-wrote-lovely-leitrim

 

 

 

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Griffintown is currently home to Black Rock, a boulder erected in 1859 to memorialize the Irish people who immigrated to Montreal during the Great Famine but perished upon arrival amid a typhus outbreak. CBC reported earlier this year that historians believe Black Rock is “the first-ever memorial to those affected by the potato famine and the biggest Irish gravesite outside Ireland.”

 

 

 

For years, the Irish community in the area has lobbied for the creation of a park and green space at the Black Rock site, which currently sits alongside four lanes of traffic making it difficult to visit.

 

https://www.irishcentral.com/news/irish-griffintown-rem-stop

 

 

 

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http://www.geocities.ws/dalyskennelly_2000/elis.html

 

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https://youtu.be/mejzpK8ro3A

 

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Garden of Europe Listowel May 2021.

 

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As a good Irish priest taught us, “the family that prays together, stays together” and radiates peace. In a special way, such a family can be a support for other families that do not live in peace.

 

https://youtu.be/IIGgkaeZWvk

 

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